Internal or External insulation?

Internal wall insulation is done by fitting rigid insulation boards to the wall, or by building a stud wall filled in with mineral wool fiber. External wall insulation involves fixing a layer of insulation material to the wall, then covering it with a special type of render (plasterwork) or cladding. The finish can be smooth, textured, painted, tiled, paneled, pebble-dashed, or finished with brick slips.

Internal and Solid Wall Insulation

Insulating your solid walls could cut your heating costs considerably because solid walls let through twice as much heat as cavity walls do. The good news is they can be insulated – from the inside or the outside. If your home was built before 1920, its external walls are probably solid rather than cavity walls. Cavity walls are made of two layers with a small gap or ‘cavity’ between them. Solid walls have no such gap, so they let more heat through. Solid walls can be insulated – either from the inside or the outside. This will cost more than insulating a standard cavity wall, but the savings on your heating bills will be bigger too.

External Wall Insulation

Is a form of insulation fixed to the exterior of an existing or new dwelling. The high-performance insulation slab is then rendered to give a protective and decorative coating to the existing facade. Around a third of all heat lost in an insulated home is lost through the walls. External wall insulation is one of the most effective ways to reduce the amount of energy needed to heat a home. Around a third of all heat lost in an insulated home is lost through the walls. External wall insulation is one of the most effective ways to reduce the amount of energy needed to heat a home.

KEY BENEFITS

  • Saves money Save around € 800 per year on energy bills. Save around 2.5 tons of CO2 a year.
  • Increase longevity Extends the lifespan of the building. Improve appearance Significantly.

Roof and Loft insulation

The insulation of the Roof is one of the most important works to save energy. It contributes significantly to energy saving since in this way it is limited to a large extent the transfer of heat to and from the environment. So, we have a reduction in the costs of heating and cooling our space since the temperature inside is maintained for a long time. We create and maintain conditions of thermal comfort in our homemaking our stay pleasant, avoiding the unbearable heat in the summer and the intense cold in winter.

Floor Insulation

Insulating under the floorboards on your ground floor will save you around € 150-£250 a year, and you can seal the gaps between floors and skirting boards to reduce draughts too. Gaps and droughts around skirting boards and floors are simple to fix yourself with a tube of sealant bought from any DIY store. Floorboards will rot without adequate ventilation, though, so don’t block under-floor airbricks in your outside walls. Older homes are more likely to have suspended timber floors. Timber floors can be insulated by lifting the floorboards and laying mineral wool insulation supported by netting between the joists.

You can obviously insulate partially or combine the roof, walls, floors, windows, and doors. The most important loss is the walls as for a typical house the walls reach 30-40% in thermal losses. The roof comes second with about 25%. After doors and windows lose 20% and finally the floor has the least loss especially if it touches the ground.